News

‘Healthy’ Obese Still Face Higher Heart Disease Risk
‘Healthy’ Obese Still Face Higher Heart Disease RiskEven without high blood pressure or other signs of illness, obese adults have a much higher risk of developing heart disease than normal-weight peers, according to a study from Denmark. The results contradict recent research suggesting a subgroup of obese ...read more
Source: The Huffington Post
Published on Fri, 24 Mar 2017 12:45:00 GMT
Heart disease health centre
Heart disease health centreFor example, grouping non-drinkers with former drinkers, who may have stopped drinking due to poor health. Researchers at the University of Cambridge and University College London analysed electronic health records for almost two million healthy United ...read more
Source: Le Camp des recrues
Published on Fri, 24 Mar 2017 12:47:00 GMT
Moderate drinking can lower risk of heart attack, says study
Moderate drinking can lower risk of heart attack, says studyModerate alcohol consumption has long been associated with a lower risk of heart disease compared with abstinence or heavy drinking but the authors described their study as the most comprehensive to date on the relationship. Non-drinkers were separated ...read more
Source: The Guardian
Published on Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:46:00 GMT
Morning Report: Fish Oil and Heart Disease--AHA Science Advisory
Morning Report: Fish Oil and Heart Disease--AHA Science AdvisoryHello. I'm Dr Arefa Cassoobhoy, a practicing internist and a medical editor for Medscape and WebMD. Welcome to our "1-minute" news story for primary care. One large study showed that fish oil reduced mortality by 9% in patients with heart failure without ...read more
Source: Medscape News
Published on Fri, 24 Mar 2017 08:13:00 GMT
Patients and Clinicians Unite Part One: the ABCs of Heart Disease
Patients and Clinicians Unite Part One: the ABCs of Heart DiseaseDo you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S.? Living in the technological era, we're at a unique point when patients and clinicians can partner together to turn the tables on heart disease. In this two-part article, we'll first ...read more
Source: US News Health
Published on Wed, 22 Mar 2017 03:15:00 GMT
Regular Physical Activity Improves Health of Older Adults With Heart Disease
Regular Physical Activity Improves Health of Older Adults With Heart DiseaseOlder adults with heart disease suffer from loss of confidence and an inability to perform simple tasks. Regular physical activity can lower heart disease symptoms and improve confidence of older adults. Certain medications for heart disease can affect ...read more
Source: Med India
Published on Fri, 24 Mar 2017 04:35:00 GMT
Exercise can improve health in older patients with heart disease
Exercise can improve health in older patients with heart diseaseOlder people dealing with heart disease have often been told to take it easy, but the best way to get better may be to get moving. Physical activity helps reduce symptoms and allows these patients to keep performing everyday tasks, like carrying groceries ...read more
Source: Today.com
Published on Thu, 23 Mar 2017 14:05:00 GMT
An End to Heart Disease? Not Quite
An End to Heart Disease? Not QuiteImagine you have a high risk of heart disease. Maybe you even have had a heart attack or a stroke. Since then you have done everything you can to stay healthy: you exercise, track your blood pressure, take a statin. With the publication of a new study last ...read more
Source: New York Times
Published on Mon, 20 Mar 2017 20:53:00 GMT
Only 8% of Women Know When To Start Getting Heart Screenings
Only 8% of Women Know When To Start Getting Heart ScreeningsConsidering that heart disease is the number one killer of women, you'd think we'd be talking about it a lot more. But women aren't just avoiding the conversation—they're avoiding heart screenings until it may be too late. A new national survey by ...read more
Source: womansday.com
Published on Fri, 24 Mar 2017 12:31:00 GMT
Painkillers like ibuprofen can increase the risk of heart disease and should be restricted
Painkillers like ibuprofen can increase the risk of heart disease and should be restrictedMichael Stokes receives scholarship funding from the Royal Adelaide Hospital Research Committee. Peter Psaltis receives research funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, National Heart Foundation of Australia and Abbott ...read more
Source: THE CONVERSATION
Published on Thu, 23 Mar 2017 12:16:00 GMT